My Miniatures on Roll20

I’ve been running two campaigns of Navah on Roll20 for quite a while now, and I make my own miniatures for them. I messed up in my first efforts (described in an old post), in that I make them 100 pixels high (lost a lot of detail), left on the stands (which messed up scaling), and did my own white surrounds (messy). So here’s my corrected formula.

1. I find a picture of a miniature I like through Google.

2. I open the image in Paint.net and trim off everything but the character. Usually the stands have some extra grass or something on there, so I usually have to redraw the shoes or boots.

3. Roll20 distorts images that aren’t square, so I often reposition arms that are holding swords high above the hero’s head to make it fit in the standard size. That helps when I put figures near each other and they click to the hex they’re in.

4. I add a second layer (black) behind the figure to make sure I’ve removed everything I wanted to. Then I make that layer invisible.

5. Once the character is edited, I save a copy. My naming protocol is: ThiefMale03DaggerLARGE.png for a male thief with a dagger, the third thief I’ve made. The LARGE means this is my original edited image, which I save as a backup in case I screw up later. I save it as a PNG so it has a transparent surround.

6. Now I resize it down. 200×200 pixels is the size for most characters. Figures holding a long staff or holding a torch aloft will be 220×220. Horses & Cows and the like are 250×250. Giants may be as large as 500×500.

7. I adjust Contrast and Brightness to get a clear image. Please note I don’t do this until the character is its final size, as it makes a difference. Usually I darken the character and add contrast, so it is easier to see at its smaller size.

8. I adjust Saturation (under Hue & Saturation). Usually I bump it up to 104% to 110% to give it more color, but occasionally I’m drop it down to as low as 85%. It depends on the figure.

9. I use Effects/Object to add a white surround (3 pixels wide) around the figure, so it stands out against any background.

I’ve finally reached the point where I’ve redone most of the original images I did in 100×100 size, and I’m starting to add new ones. It took a few months to get there! I am now working on digitized versions of some of my old miniatures from 1978-1982, when I was still painting them. It’s really hard to get a clear image, so they aren’t great. I may have to get a new lens to do them justice, as there’s a lot of personal emotion tied up in them. Again, they are not great — they just mean a lot to me. I’m going to share a few with you here.

Lion miniature from Ta-Hr, painted an odd greenish yellow
This one is a lion from Ta-Hr, a company in Bloomington, Indiana. I’ve got to adjust that color!

Ral Partha Hill Giant miniature
A Ral Partha Hill Giant. I loved this figure!

Ral Partha Treant miniature
An early Ral Partha Treant. Pretty crude by today’s standards.

Ral Partha Earth Elemental miniature
A Ral Partha Earth Elemental. Ditto.

Ral Partha Sorceror miniature, painted as Grey Elf
One of my favorite Ral Partha figures, a grey elf mage, namely Tiloniel the Grey. He’s still an NPC in Navah, over 35 years later!

Ral Partha Wizard miniature, old with a faded blue cloak
A Ral Partha hedge wizard. Another fun one, but I’m going to have to fix that blue.

A Goblin King, Manufacturer unknown
The Goblin King. This one wasn’t mine — it was the only painted figure I ever bought. I think I got it at a convention in Notre Dame back around 1980. Anyone know who the artist was?

A Slarg demon, my own digital creation
A Slarg, one of the more feared demons in my Navah campaign. This one was never a real figure — it is my own digital creation. I kind of like it.

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About lostdelights

An old gamer flying his freak flag, I've been playing table-top role-playing games since 1978. I've been building my own system (Journeyman) since 1981.
This entry was posted in Gaming Tools & Accessories, Miniatures. Bookmark the permalink.

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